Sagrada Familia: Door Detail Barcelona

Barcelona has some Very Big Doors

Barcelona does indeed have some very big doors….. ……..but none so grand, in my opinion, as this one at Sagrada Familia Cathedral. And what about that handle (if that’s what it is) at the top left corner? Even when I pulled myself up to my full five feet five and three quarter inches, I still couldn’t quite reach it to let myself in.     Like every other square inch of this wonderful building, both inside and outside, the detail is stunning:   And this wasn’t even the main entrance! That was bigger. To see more doors from around the world, why not pop over to Norm’s Thursday Doors

The Construction of Sagrada Familia

The Construction of Sagrada Familia Cathedral (or more correctly “Basilica”) in Barcelona has been going on for a very long time; since 1882 in fact. When the first architect, Francisco de Paula del Villar, resigned a year later in 1883, the project was taken over by Antoni Gaudi who totally changed the design. On the subject of the extremely long construction period, Gaudí is said to have remarked: “My client (God) is not in a hurry.” When Gaudí died in 1926, the basilica was between 15 and 25 percent complete. – Wiki The finishing date has recently been given as mid to late 2020’s. Let’s see. We’re going back next year to check up on progress! I took this first picture from an open-topped bus on our first day in Barcelona:     I took these next pictures the day we visited Sagrada Familia:     To see the colourful interior please click here.   Thanks again to Cee for her Black & White Challenges:

Sagrada Familia: Colours of Light

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge this week is to post images showing Big and Small. I’ve seldom felt as small as when I visited Barcelona’s Sagrada Familia. It is the biggest building I’ve ever been inside and what an experience it was. I was in Wonderland, The Hall of the Mountain King, The Greatest Wonder of the Modern World.  I was in the basilica that the Catalan architect Antoni Gaudi designed for his city and which has been under construction since 1883. Rumour has it that it may be finished in the mid-2020’s. Whilst my tourist snapshots don’t do it justice at all, they do serve to remind me of its beauty and its grandeur. It is quite simply breath-taking. (If you want to see some professional pictures of it they are here on the Sagrada Familia Website. Or better still book yourself a trip to Barcelona and enjoy it all first hand. Travel Tip: skip breakfast, get there early and have a pre-booked timed-entry ticket. Once you’re inside you can stay as long as you like). By getting there early and being in no hurry to leave, we were able to follow the light as the sun shone at different angles, highlighting […]

Behind Closed Doors

The Closed Doors of the Confessionals in Barcelona’s Cathedral of the Holy Cross and Saint Eulalia. This Gothic cathedral was constructed between the 13th and 15th centuries, with most of the work done in the 14th century.     The cathedral is dedicated to Eulalia of Barcelona, co-patron saint of Barcelona, a young virgin who, according to Catholic tradition, suffered martyrdom during Roman times in the city. One story says that she was exposed naked in the public square and a miraculous snowfall in mid-spring covered her nudity. The enraged Romans put her into a barrel with knives stuck into it and rolled it down a street (according to tradition, the one now called Baixada de Santa Eulàlia). The body of Saint Eulalia is entombed in the cathedral’s crypt.- Wikipedia For more Thursday Doors from bloggers around the world, head over to  Norm’s Weekly Challenge.

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